Immune Mover™: Teri Cochrane Brand Supplement 120ct – “Out of Stock”

$59.97

When daily stress, inadequate nutrition, and a lack of sleep or exercise combine to overtax the body, harmful pathogens can take hold and overwhelm our biological defenses, disrupting our immune function.

Immune Mover™ provides sustainable, daily immune support for everyone’s new every day.

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Description

Intelligent immune support starts with your genes.

IMMUNE-MOVER is a unique formula that combines 11 botanicals to fortify the body’s immune and digestive systems, while working synergistically with your epigenetic tendencies to optimize their expression.

Its intelligent blend of pure botanicals and powerful antioxidants rebalance the body through two mechanisms – facilitating a balanced biome in the digestive tract and fortifying immune system response, targeting pathogenic imbalance and immunity at the root.

IMMUNE-MOVER can help balance and support:

·   Immune System Response

·   Adrenal Function

·   Digestion and Absorption

·   Chronic Fatigue

·   Gut Integrity

·   Bacterial, Fungal & Parasitic Imbalances

·   Hormonal Balance

·   Recurrent Candida

·   Recurrent Strep Throat

·   Hypoglycemia

·   Skin & Hair Health

Not all supplements are created equal: The Teri Cochrane Blueprint

Designed with commonly overlooked genetic sensitivities in mind, my formulation is free of oxalates, sulfur-containing compounds and adaptogenic fungi – common additives in immune-support supplements that have been shown to contribute to inflammation and poor microbial health, and encourage the growth of pathogens, sparking immune irritation.

Unlike most immune-support supplements, nothing in my formulation downregulates phase one liver detoxification or blocks sulfation pathways for oxalate metabolism.

IMMUNE-MOVER intentionally omits imbalancing ingredients to optimize epigenetic response for maximum efficacy and absorption. Our formulation is clean and pure – free from gluten, dairy, and Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs).

IMMUNE-MOVER : Gene-Smart Immune Fortification For Everyone’s New Every Day.

This statement has not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

IMMUNE-MOVER is formulated especially to support immune function and the digestive tract. Many immune-oriented supplements are available in the marketplace – our goal was to create one unlike any others. The formula is powerful and efficacious. Because each one of us is unique, IMMUNE-MOVER was intentionally formulated to support the body’s response to an excessive pathogenic load, especially in the digestive tract. This formulation intentionally uses ingredients that are not involved in disrupting genetic expression or down regulating detoxification pathways. This in turn supports to restore overall immune function and allows for resilience in light of physical, emotional, and psychological stressors. A deep body of scientific literature has elucidated the efficacy of botanicals when dealing with infections /overgrowths of pathogens such as bacteria, fungi, parasites and viruses.

French Tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus), Thyme (Thymus vulgaris), and Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) – aromatic plants, typical of the Mediterranean area, shown to have antibacterial and cleansing properties (1,2)

Indian Tinaspora (Tinospora cordifolia) — a climbing shrub found throughout the Indian subcontinent and China. It is widely used for its soothing and antioxidant properties (3). The root of this plant is known for its anti-stress activities (3). Tinaspora has been tested successfully for immuno-modulatory activity (3).

Horsetail (Equisetum arvense) – has been shown to have antioxidant and antibacterial properties (4, 20).

Pau D’Arco – (Tabebuia impetiginosa) is a tree native to the Amazonian rainforest. A tea from its bark has significant cleansing properties.

Stinging Nettle Extract -– Mineral rich and in laboratory studies, shown to inhibit oxidative stress (6,13 ).

Blueberry – contains compounds including anthocyanins, which have been shown to be have high antioxidant capacity and other beneficial properties (9). Anthocyanins have also been shown to support the body’s detoxification process(10,11). Blueberries have immune supporting properties possibly due to their polyphenol content (12).

Olive leaf – a botanical with phenolic compounds,which have been shown to have antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. (15, 16)

Acerola – a fruit extract known for its high vitamin C content and immune boosting capacity. (17-19)

Black Walnut – a species of deciduous tree in the walnut family, native to eastern North America. It has cleansing and antioxidant properties and has been used topically on skin (13).

Thyme & Rosemary- High antioxidant levels and antimicrobial properties 21-26

References:

1) Deans, S. G., and Katerina P. Svoboda. “Antibacterial activity of French tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus Linn.) essential oil and its constituents during ontogeny.” Journal of Horticultural Science 63, no. 3 (1988): 503-508.

2) Piccaglia, Roberta, M. Marotti, E. Giovanelli, S. G. Deans, and Elizabeth Eaglesham. “Antibacterial and antioxidant properties of Mediterranean aromatic plants.” Industrial crops and Products 2, no. 1 (1993): 47-50.

3) Singh, S. S., S. C. Pandey, S. Srivastava, V. S. Gupta, B. Patro, and A. C. Ghosh. “Chemistry and medicinal properties of Tinospora cordifolia (Guduchi).” Indian journal of pharmacology 35, no. 2 (2003): 83-91.

4) Čanadanović‐Brunet, Jasna M., Gordana S. Ćetković, Sonja M. Djilas, Vesna T. Tumbas, Sladjana S. Savatović, Anamarija I. Mandić, Siniša L. Markov, and Dragoljub D. Cvetković. “Radical scavenging and antimicrobial activity of horsetail (Equisetum arvense L.) extracts.” International journal of food science & technology 44, no. 2 (2009): 269-278.

5) Park, Byeoung-Soo, Hyun-Kyung Lee, Sung-Eun Lee, Xiang-Lan Piao, Gary R. Takeoka, Rosalind Y. Wong, Young-Joon Ahn, and Jeong-Han Kim. “Antibacterial activity of Tabebuia impetiginosa Martius ex DC (Taheebo) against Helicobacter pylori.” Journal of ethnopharmacology 105, no. 1-2 (2006): 255-262.

6) Riehemann, Kristina, Bert Behnke, and Klaus Schulze-Osthoff. “Plant extracts from stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), an antirheumatic remedy, inhibit the proinflammatory transcription factor NF‐κB.” FEBS letters 442, no. 1 (1999): 89-94.

7) Correa-Betanzo, J., E. Allen-Vercoe, J. McDonald, K. Schroeter, M. Corredig, and G. Paliyath. “Stability and biological activity of wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) polyphenols during simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion.” Food Chemistry 165 (2014): 522-531.

8) Kong, Jin-Ming, Lian-Sai Chia, Ngoh-Khang Goh, Tet-Fatt Chia, and R. Brouillard. “Analysis and biological activities of anthocyanins.” Phytochemistry 64, no. 5 (2003): 923-933.

9) Shih, Ping-Hsiao, Chi-Tai Yeh, and Gow-Chin Yen. “Effects of anthocyanidin on the inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells.” Food and chemical toxicology 43, no. 10 (2005): 1557-1566.

10) Sekizawa, Haruhito, Kazufumi Ikuta, Katsumi Mizuta, Seiichi Takechi, and Tatsuo Suzutani. “Relationship between polyphenol content and anti‐influenza viral effects of berries.” Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 93, no. 9 (2013): 2239-2241.

11) Wang, Yu-Ping, Ming-Liang Cheng, Bao-Fang Zhang, Mao Mu, Ming-Yu Zhou, Jun Wu, and Cheng-Xiu Li. “Effect of blueberry on hepatic and immunological functions in mice.” Hepatobiliary Pancreat Dis Int 9, no. 2 (2010): 164-168.

12) Lans C, Turner N, Khan T, Brauer G. Ethnoveterinary medicines used to treat endoparasites and stomach problems in pigs and pets in British Columbia, Canada. Vet Parasitol 2007;148(3-4):325–40.

13) Nwaoguikpe, R. N., C. O. Ujowundu, and B. Wesley. “Phytochemical and biochemical compositions of African Walnut (Tetracarpidium conophorum).” Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences(JPBMS) 20, no. 20 (2012).

14) Rutto, Laban K., et al. “Mineral properties and dietary value of raw and processed stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.).” International journal of food science 2013 (2013).

15) El, Sedef N., and Sibel Karakaya. “Olive tree (Olea europaea) leaves: potential beneficial effects on human health.” Nutrition reviews 67.11 (2009): 632-638.

16) Lee, Ok-Hwan, and Boo-Yong Lee. “Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of individual and combined phenolics in Olea europaea leaf extract.” Bioresource technology 101.10 (2010): 3751-3754.

17) Mezadri, T., et al. “Antioxidant compounds and antioxidant activity in acerola (Malpighia emarginata DC.) fruits and derivatives.” Journal of Food Composition and analysis 21.4 (2008): 282-290.

18) Hanamura, Takayuki, et al. “Antihyperglycemic effect of polyphenols from Acerola (Malpighia emarginata DC.) fruit.” Bioscience, biotechnology, and biochemistry 70.8 (2006): 1813-1820.

19) Engels, Gayle, and Josef Brinckmann. “Acerola-Malpighia glabra.”

20) Sandhu, NAVDEEP SINGH, S. A. R. A. B. J. I. T. Kaur, and D. I. V. N. E. E. T. Chopra. “Equisetum arvense: pharmacology and phytochemistry–a review.” Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research 3.3 (2010): 146-150.

21) Tapsell, Linda C., et al. “Health benefits of herbs and spices: the past, the present, the future.” (2006).

22) Craig, Winston J. “Health-promoting properties of common herbs.” The American journal of clinical nutrition 70.3 (1999): 491s-499s.

23) Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna, et al. “A comprehensive study on the phenolic profile of widely used culinary herbs and spices: Rosemary, thyme, oregano, cinnamon, cumin and bay.” Food Chemistry 154 (2014): 299-307.

24) Campo, Jose Del, Marie-Josephe Amiot, and Christophe Nguyen-The. “Antimicrobial effect of rosemary extracts.” Journal of food protection 63.10 (2000): 1359-1368.

25) Moreno, Silvia, et al. “Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of rosemary extracts linked to their polyphenol composition.” Free radical research 40.2 (2006): 223-231.

26) Nzeako, B. C., Zahra SN Al-Kharousi, and Zahra Al-Mahrooqui. “Antimicrobial activities of clove and thyme extracts.” sultan qaboos university medical journal 6.1 (2006): 33.

 

 

· · quality professional strength supplements since 1989. Our “Science First” philosophy ensures our products are based on the most recent research and use the highest quality raw ingredients.

lth.*

·

[HB1]FDA considers reference to “pathogenic overgrowth” to be a disease claim that is not permitted for dietary supplements. Claims of this nature would raise “red flag” risk as suggesting a drug use for the product, which could trigger an FDA warning letter or FTC enforcement action. Instead, dietary supplements must be promoted for use in affecting the normal, healthy structure or function of the body, as illustrated in the edits provided below.

This same comment applies to much of the text below, referencing disease or symptoms of disease, e.g., inflammation, anti-viral, anti-bacterial, candida, strep throat, etc.

Suggested alternative text is provided to illustrate the types of claims that would not create illegal drug status from an FDA perspective, or be likely to raise FTC regulatory risk.

[HB2]This text below needs to be substantially revised and softened to avoid making disease claims.

[HB3]We would suggest softening the claims significantly to address both FDA and FTC issues, particularly with respect to claims substantiation. It would seem difficult to substantiate even the claims that would not suggest a drug use for the product based on what would appear to be a relatively small amount of the the herb in the product, and not a standardized extract.

[HB4]Also less risky would be: used for promoting intestinal health – or similar.

[HB5]Delete Ref. 8 since it does not appear to directly support the structure-function claims being made.

[HB6]Symptoms would suggest a drug use for the product, raising FDA issues. Instead, consider use of “Health Benefits” or similar, e.g., “Designed to Promote:” or “Supports.”

[HB7]A claim to help protect against hair loss caused by aging or stress would be acceptable for a dietary supplement because the hair loss is caused by a life process (normal aging) or stage (stress). However, this type of claim would seem very difficult to substantiate and defend, if challenged, without product specific clinical data on the Compr-IMN product.

[HB8]We have deleted certain references that could raise FDA issues insofar as the studies do not seem relevant to the Compr-IMN supplement or the structure-function claims being made for the product.

components and modulate cellular immune function in mice (13).

Black walnut – is a species of deciduous tree in the walnut family, native to eastern North America. It has cleansing and antioxidant properties and has been used topically on skin.* is efficacious against ringworm, tapeworm, pin or thread worm, and other parasites of the intestine (14, 15). Black walnut has been used topically to alleviate eczema, psoriasis, warts, ring worm and severe itching (16). It also has been shown to have antifungal and antibacterial properties (17).

SYMPTOMS [HB6] RESOLVED:

HEALTH BENEFITS:

• Energy (or Anti-Fatigue)

• Skin Rashes Skin Health

• Leaky gGut integrity

• Acid reflux

• Hypoglycemia Balances blood sugar when used as part of a healthy diet

• Stomach pain

• Recurrent strep throat

• Recurrent candida

• Brain fog Brain health

• Eczema

• Supports Hhormonale balanceing

• Alopecia/ Hair loss[HB7] Promotes Hair Health

• Fungal/viral warts

• Viral Internal balance*

• Bacterial balance

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

References:[HB8]

1) Deans, S. G., and Katerina P. Svoboda. “Antibacterial activity of French tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus Linn.) essential oil and its constituents during ontogeny.” Journal of Horticultural Science 63, no. 3 (1988): 503-508.

2) Piccaglia, Roberta, M. Marotti, E. Giovanelli, S. G. Deans, and Elizabeth Eaglesham. “Antibacterial and antioxidant properties of Mediterranean aromatic plants.” Industrial crops and Products 2, no. 1 (1993): 47-50.

3) Singh, S. S., S. C. Pandey, S. Srivastava, V. S. Gupta, B. Patro, and A. C. Ghosh. “Chemistry and medicinal properties of Tinospora cordifolia (Guduchi).” Indian journal of pharmacology 35, no. 2 (2003): 83-91.

4) Čanadanović‐Brunet, Jasna M., Gordana S. Ćetković, Sonja M. Djilas, Vesna T. Tumbas, Sladjana S. Savatović, Anamarija I. Mandić, Siniša L. Markov, and Dragoljub D. Cvetković. “Radical scavenging and antimicrobial activity of horsetail (Equisetum arvense L.) extracts.” International journal of food science & technology 44, no. 2 (2009): 269-278.

5) Park, Byeoung-Soo, Hyun-Kyung Lee, Sung-Eun Lee, Xiang-Lan Piao, Gary R. Takeoka, Rosalind Y. Wong, Young-Joon Ahn, and Jeong-Han Kim. “Antibacterial activity of Tabebuia impetiginosa Martius ex DC (Taheebo) against Helicobacter pylori.” Journal of ethnopharmacology 105, no. 1-2 (2006): 255-262.

1) Macedo, L., T. Fernandes, L. Silveira, A. Mesquita, A. A. Franchitti, and E. A. Ximenes. “β-Lapachone activity in synergy with conventional antimicrobials against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains.” Phytomedicine 21, no. 1 (2013): 25-29.

6) Riehemann, Kristina, Bert Behnke, and Klaus Schulze-Osthoff. “Plant extracts from stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), an antirheumatic remedy, inhibit the proinflammatory transcription factor NF‐κB.” FEBS letters 442, no. 1 (1999): 89-94.

1) Konrad, Lutz, Hans-Helge Müller, Corinna Lenz, Helge Laubinger, Gerhard Aumüller, and Johannes Josef Lichius. “Antiproliferative effect on human prostate cancer cells by a stinging nettle root (Urtica dioica) extract.” Planta medica 66, no. 01 (2000): 44-47.

7) Correa-Betanzo, J., E. Allen-Vercoe, J. McDonald, K. Schroeter, M. Corredig, and G. Paliyath. “Stability and biological activity of wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) polyphenols during simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion.” Food Chemistry 165 (2014): 522-531.

8) Kong, Jin-Ming, Lian-Sai Chia, Ngoh-Khang Goh, Tet-Fatt Chia, and R. Brouillard. “Analysis and biological activities of anthocyanins.” Phytochemistry 64, no. 5 (2003): 923-933.

9) Shih, Ping-Hsiao, Chi-Tai Yeh, and Gow-Chin Yen. “Effects of anthocyanidin on the inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells.” Food and chemical toxicology 43, no. 10 (2005): 1557-1566.

10) Sekizawa, Haruhito, Kazufumi Ikuta, Katsumi Mizuta, Seiichi Takechi, and Tatsuo Suzutani. “Relationship between polyphenol content and anti‐influenza viral effects of berries.” Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 93, no. 9 (2013): 2239-2241.

11) Wang, Yu-Ping, Ming-Liang Cheng, Bao-Fang Zhang, Mao Mu, Ming-Yu Zhou, Jun Wu, and Cheng-Xiu Li. “Effect of blueberry on hepatic and immunological functions in mice.” Hepatobiliary Pancreat Dis Int 9, no. 2 (2010): 164-168.

12) Lans C, Turner N, Khan T, Brauer G. Ethnoveterinary medicines used to treat endoparasites and stomach problems in pigs and pets in British Columbia, Canada. Vet Parasitol 2007;148(3-4):325–40.

1) Oates, L ‘Complementary Medicines for Intestinal Parasites’, Australian Pharmacist, 2012. vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 132-135.

13) Nwaoguikpe, R. N., C. O. Ujowundu, and B. Wesley. “Phytochemical and biochemical compositions of African Walnut (Tetracarpidium conophorum).” Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences(JPBMS) 20, no. 20 (2012).

· IMMUNE SYSTEM SUPPORT: Oilve leaf extract contains oleuropein which may help support immune system health.*

· PURE INGREDIENTS: Pure Encapsulations® manufactures a line of hypoallergenic, research-based dietary supplements. Products are meticulously formulated using pure ingredients designed to deliver predictable results for the benefit of all patients, even the most sensitive.*

· FREE FROM: Pure Encapsulations products are free from wheat, gluten, egg, peanuts, magnesium stearate, hydrogenated fat, artificial sweeteners and colors, and other unnecessary excipients. Any product containing ingredients derived from allergens, such as soy, dairy or shellfish is clearly labeled. * These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

[HB1]FDA considers reference to “pathogenic overgrowth” to be a disease claim that is not permitted for dietary supplements. Claims of this nature would raise “red flag” risk as suggesting a drug use for the product, which could trigger an FDA warning letter or FTC enforcement action. Instead, dietary supplements must be promoted for use in affecting the normal, healthy structure or function of the body, as illustrated in the edits provided below.

This same comment applies to much of the text below, referencing disease or symptoms of disease, e.g., inflammation, anti-viral, anti-bacterial, candida, strep throat, etc.

Suggested alternative text is provided to illustrate the types of claims that would not create illegal drug status from an FDA perspective, or be likely to raise FTC regulatory risk.

[HB2]This text below needs to be substantially revised and softened to avoid making disease claims.

[HB3]We would suggest softening the claims significantly to address both FDA and FTC issues, particularly with respect to claims substantiation. It would seem difficult to substantiate even the claims that would not suggest a drug use for the product based on what would appear to be a relatively small amount of the the herb in the product, and not a standardized extract.

[HB4]Also less risky would be: used for promoting intestinal health – or similar.

[HB5]Delete Ref. 8 since it does not appear to directly support the structure-function claims being made.

[HB6]Symptoms would suggest a drug use for the product, raising FDA issues. Instead, consider use of “Health Benefits” or similar, e.g., “Designed to Promote:” or “Supports.”

[HB7]A claim to help protect against hair loss caused by aging or stress would be acceptable for a dietary supplement because the hair loss is caused by a life process (normal aging) or stage (stress). However, this type of claim would seem very difficult to substantiate and defend, if challenged, without product specific clinical data on the Compr-IMN product.

[HB8]We have deleted certain references that could raise FDA issues insofar as the studies do not seem relevant to the IMMUNE-MOVER supplement or the structure-function claims being made for the product.

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